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The Five Boro Bike Tour begins in NYC. See where it ends and how to get around today.

NEW YORK — New York City Five Boro Bike Tour is the largest nonprofit bike ride in the United States. It begins in Manhattan, then stretches 40 miles through the five boroughs and ends in Staten Island.

Route map of the Five Boro Bike Tour

Bicycle New York


The first wave of cyclists started at 7:30 a.m. at the intersection of Franklin and Church Streets in Tribeca.

“It was a great goal and it was a tour, not a race, so we thought it would be the first for us. We’re not cyclists, so we did some training,” said rider Nichole Muller of Texas at the start line.

“We ride a tandem bike together, so that will be interesting to take it to another level. We trained yesterday in Central Park, we are good in New York, we are good,” added rider Meredith Mitsifer from Arizona. “It’s going to be great, I can’t wait to see New York in a completely different way.”

The route then heads up into the Bronx, over to Queens, back to Brooklyn and ends at Fort Wadsworth on Staten Island, where riders can then catch a ferry back to Manhattan.

Five road closures on the Boro Bike Tour

Of course, the bike tour also means road, bridge and tunnel closures for drivers throughout the city.

The lower level of the Verrazzano Narrows Bridge toward Staten Island will be closed from 2 a.m. to 7 p.m. The upper level remains open in both directions.

The Robert F. Kennedy Bridge exit to southbound FDR Drive will be closed from 7:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. Access from the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel to the westbound Gowanus/Brooklyn Queens Expressway will be closed from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m

The full list of road closures can be found here.

Cycling for a good cause

More than 32,000 cyclists take part in the ride, which raises money to fund Bike New York's free bike education programs. The nonprofit organization teaches children and adults how to ride bikes and bike safety.

Drivers from around the world say it's a rare opportunity to explore the city in this way.

“I think a lot of people who might not be familiar with the city think that New York is just Manhattan, but New York has so much more to offer and I think it's probably the most unique way to do it by bike “You might do it,” said Will Stafford of Virginia.

Many arrived on Saturday to collect their race numbers and take part in the annual blessing of the bikes.

“One of the reasons people come here, certainly not the only one, but one of the reasons is that people are aware of how dangerous it is to ride a bike in New York and they come to ensure their own safety “Pray with them for their own safety,” said Patrick Malloy, dean of St. Catherine of the Divine Cathedral.

Anna Harden

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