close
close

Apartment evictions in New York City in 2023 are not as bad as the media claims

The most heartbreaking real estate myths die hard. Take the propaganda that evictions are increasing in the Big Apple.

The false argument was used endlessly to support so-called “eviction for cause” (which would have made it nearly impossible to evict defaulting tenants) and to later complain that the watered-down version passed by the state legislature didn't go nearly far enough go.

The New York Times' tendentious reporting gave the impression that tenants were being thrown out en masse.


The 12,139 residential tenant terminations in 2023 were 28.6% fewer than in 2019. Christopher Sadowski

There were more than 25,000 evictions in 2015 alone
There were more than 25,000 evictions in 2015 alone nito – stock.adobe.com

Gothamist wrote in January: “Evictions are increasing across New York City, with the monthly rate of legal lockouts beginning to match pre-pandemic numbers in the second half of 2023.”

Patch howled that evictions were “up nearly 200 percent.”

But the truth is 100% the opposite. For most of 2022 and 2023, evictions actually increased — but only because of a backlog of cases due to a statewide Covid-era eviction moratorium in effect until mid-January 2022.

The meaningful comparison of the most recent evictions refers to the years before 2020.

The 12,139 residential tenant terminations in 2023 were 28.6% fewer than in 2019.

Additionally, evictions in 2023 were barely half the previous 20-year average (again, excluding the moratorium period). For example, in 2015 alone there were more than 25,000 evictions.

These statistics come not from a real estate lobbying organization, but from a source that can hardly be considered a tool for landlords: the New York City Rent Guideline's Board, which laid out the facts in its 2024 Income and Affordability Study. You can look them up on page 31.

Anna Harden

Learn More →

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *