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Greater Idaho Movement leader explains why Oregon counties want to secede and join the Gem State

By Martha Williams for Dailymail.Com

14:41 May 28, 2024, updated 15:00 May 28, 2024

The leader of a group of Oregonians determined to leave the state has revealed why they want to escape the state's liberal politics by joining Idaho.

Matt McCaw is the executive director of the Greater Idaho Movement, which advocates for moving Oregon's border 200 miles to the left.

The proposal would shift Oregon's border so that 14 counties and several subcounties would fall under Idaho's state borders.

McCaw said the movement was launched to bridge the growing tug-of-war in the Pacific Northwest state.

“The state of Oregon is divided geographically by the Cascade Mountain range, and that geographical divide is also a major cultural divide,” McCaw told Fox News.

Matt McCaw is the executive director of the Greater Idaho Movement, which advocates for moving Oregon's border 200 miles to the left.
The proposal pictured would move Oregon's border 200 miles west, meaning 14 counties and several subcounties would fall under Idaho's state lines.

“So the west side of Oregon has a different climate, a different economy, a different culture and it's more urban. It's a very different place than the east side, where you have very conservative and traditional farmers.”

He continued, “In Oregon, there are two very different groups of people trying to engage in a tug-of-war over state government.”

McCaw explains that the movement's plan is to prevent the conflict that has arisen between two clearly and fundamentally different population groups.

He claims that the party in power (currently the Democrats) is imposing its values ​​and policies on people living hundreds of miles away.

Organizers of the Greater Idaho Movement say people in eastern Oregon are alienated by the state's progressive policies and are responsible for the high crime rate.

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They claim that moving to Idaho would allow residents to benefit from lower taxes and ensure better representation and government.

McCaw cited the example of the Covid-19 pandemic, during which political measures were imposed on involuntary Oregon residents who refused to comply with quarantine rules or mask requirements.

“During the COVID pandemic, the state of Oregon has been one of the most extreme. Businesses across the state have been closed, churches across the state have been closed, schools have been closed, mask mandates have been implemented, and later vaccination mandates have been implemented,” McCaw said.

“This was all state policy issued by government institutions like the Oregon Health Authority, which issued these guidelines for the entire state.”

Crook County was the last county to approve the Greater Idaho Measure after a vote last Tuesday.

Crook County was the last county to approve the Greater Idaho Measure after a vote last Tuesday.

The so-called Measure 7-86 was passed in Crook County with 53 percent of the vote, giving new impetus to the election campaign in the greater Idaho area.

However, the vote is not legally binding and simply means that residents agree to inform state and federal officials that they support negotiations to annex part of Oregon.

“Eastern Oregon voters have expressed loud and clear their desire to see border talks move forward,” McCaw said earlier.

“With this latest result in Crook County, there is no excuse for the legislature and the governor to continue to ignore the wishes of the people.”

“We call on the Governor, Speaker of the House and Senate President to sit down with us and discuss the next steps to change governance for the citizens of Eastern Oregon. We also call on the State Legislature to hold hearings on what a potential boundary change might look like.”

“For the past three years, we have gone directly to voters and asked them what they want for their state government,” added President Mike McCarter.

This map shows the counties that would be incorporated into the state of Idaho if the movement is approved.
According to the group's leader, Matt McCaw, the movement was founded to bridge the growing tug-of-war in the Pacific Northwest state

“With these votes they are telling us that they expect their politicians to move the border.”

“In our system, responsibility lies with the people, and it is time for the politicians who represent the people to assume their responsibility.”

Oregon was thrown into chaos after lawmakers passed a controversial law called Measure 110 in 2021 that repealed criminal prosecutions for drug possession.

Under Measure 110, police gave addicts a ticket with a $100 fine, which was waived if they called a treatment hotline and agreed to take a health screening.

The system proved to be useless – more than 95 percent of the tickets were ignored.

Of the 4,000 drug abuse citations issued during the first two years of Measure 110, only 40 people called the hotline asking for treatment, so each call was calculated to cost taxpayers $7,000.

In an embarrassing reversal, Oregon Governor Tina Kotek finally reversed the measure last month.

Anna Harden

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